The Paper Story back to Homepage

The earliest inscriptions which we know dates back to 4,000 years before Christ and are of stone, of clay and wooden tablets. Since then, the writing medium has evolved… The papyrus in Egypt, since 3000 B.C., was the most common writing support. The marrow of the shrub was cut into thin strips, stacked in two perpendicular layers, wiping formed a sheet with one side horizontal and a vertical striped side stripes. By the third century A.D. the papyrus was replaced by parchment. The parchment was the writing support of the third century A.D. made from lambskin, sheep or goat, which, after being marinated in lime, was then dried and smoothed. By the thirteenth century it was replaced by paper and currently mainly used only for luxury creations. The Chinese first used the cocoons of the silkworm as fiber to get the sheets; and as early as the second century A.D. They used the bark of the mulberry tree, the bamboo stems, ramie fiber obtained from the china-grass, hemp.

The use of paper spread from the eighth century in Asia Minor; later in Africa and Spain, and with the thirteenth century throughout Europe. With the use of animal gelatin paper it appeared resistant to liquid and then allowed writing. The textile waste and rags continued to be the raw material. By the seventeenth century and the introduction of the Dutch cylinder, whose metal blades reduced the rags into pulp, preparing the mix became more rapid, requiring no more than long maceration times. With the invention of the plain paper machine invented by Robert N. L. and the grinding machine conceived by M. Leistenschneider began the industrial production later rag pulp was substituted by wood 2015 NOVA a new writing and printing experience…